Last zeal crisis election dominate

Editors note: John Defterios is CNNs Emerging Markets Editor and anchor of Global Exchange, CNNs business show focused on the emerging markets. Follow John on Twitter.
Abu Dhabi (CNN) — A great deal has been said about the five week long election underway in India.
The worlds largest democracy. 814 million people going to the polls. A candidate representing a family dynasty versus a firebrand chief minister.
But this race will likely boil down to three simple numbers that impact every citizen in the country: growth, inflation and interest rates.

John Defterios

To be blunt, they do not favor the incumbent Congress party which has ruled for the last decade.
Whats at stake?
Economic growth came in at only 4.5% in the last fiscal year, the worst performance in a decade. We are awaiting the final tally for last year, but bets are it will be below 5%.
Consumer inflation for February came in at a 25-month low of 8.1%, but that is incredibly high when the rest of the world is trying to fight off deflation, not the rising cost of food.
With prices soaring over the past year, the relatively new but high profile central bank Governor Raghuram Rajan was forced to raise interest rates three times since last September.

This race will likely boil down to three simple numbers that impact every citizen in the country: growth, inflation and interest rates.
John Defterios

The repo rate for the Reserve Bank of India stood at 8% as Indians began their journey to the polls.
Whether it is on the campaign trail in the U.S., Europe or Asia, pocketbook issues dominate.
By the numbers: The worlds biggest exercise in democracy
It is widely viewed in the Indian business community that the competent, but aging Prime Minister Manmohan Singh lost his zeal for reform and that Rahul Gandhi committed too late in the game to express a desire to lead in a party which has run out of ideas to jumpstart growth.
Prior to the global banking crisis India was humming along, with growth of over 9% for a handful of years.
You probably remember when comparisons were being made about the two towers of the emerging markets, China and India.
A state-run apparatus stacked up against the sprawling democratic structure of India, with chief ministers of states controlling so much power.

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In the Congress party era, names like Tata and Infosys came to the fore. We understood the vibrancy and productivity of Bollywood. And we are well aware of the rising middle class in India.
But this is an election where one should keep an eye two core voting blocks: the youth and those in the vast rural lands.
11 things to know about the worlds biggest election
India is a young country. Nearly half are under the age of 26. Despite the wealth creation in the past decade, about 850 million Indians live outside major cities and remain dependent on farming.
According to a poll by Pew Research ahead of the vote, both these blocks favor the BJP party by a margin of 3 to 1. They think Chief Minister Narenda Modi is better positioned to cut bureaucracy, tackle corruption and revive growth.
They were probably were led to that position by the three numbers that have clearly undermined support for the Congress party.
More from John Defterios: Why the world is watching the Fragile Five

Emerging markets split into tortoises and hares: Which will win 2014?

The has consumer already

Editors note: Watch this weeks episode of Talk Asia with Monita Rajpal featuring Pharrell Williams. It airs for the first time on Friday, December 20, 10.30am GMT/6:30 pm HKT. Follow Monita Rajpal on Twitter.
Hong Kong (CNN) — Cerebral. Thats how I would describe the producer, songwriter, musician Pharrell Williams if I could only use one word.
Yes, hes incredibly talented — as co-founder of the production powerhouse The Neptunes, he and his partner Chad Hugo have netted hit after hit. They have worked with everyone from Britney Spears to Madonna. Justin Timberlake to Jay-Z.

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Most recently, Robin Thicke probably wasnt a name you would have been familiar with until you heard this years biggest hit Blurred Lines featuring Pharrell. Yup, that was The Neptunes doing.
And dont forget about Daft Punks Get Lucky the hit No. 2 on the Billboard charts and which Billboard described as the Summer Song of 2013. Its just another part of the Pharrell phenomenon.
If you want to know more about Pharrell, you only have to look as far as the manifesto he wrote on his website. He says, I serve and represent the OTHERS because I am one myself. The others being anyone who has ever felt outside of the norm, anyone who has ever felt they couldnt be categorized, anyone who has ever felt different.
See who else has been on Talk Asia
Its often safer to be inside the proverbial box. But it takes guts to not only say that the box is too small, but to go out and create a whole other space to be free and thrive. And thats what Mr. Williams has done.
For him, the internet is that space. Its a place where democracy rules but individuality reigns. Ironic since here is a guy who has succeeded where very few can. He has been accepted by the establishment in music, fashion, art and architecture. He has become the man everyone wants to work with.

Its his humility and gratitude that make people seek him out.
Monita Rajpal, host Talk Asia

In the research process and through our conversation I saw Williams as more than the man of the moment but a man with cross pop cultural influence.
He showed me a roadmap to a non-predictable professional life, one in which his career is custom-designed and climbs no particular ladder. He speaks of a collective conscience where a shift in humanity means there are no ladders. Instead, its about seeking alternate horizons by designing your own life and your own path.
Through his I Am Other initiative, (which is now the umbrella framework under which all his projects operate) Pharrell capitalizes on this shift by turning the consumer generation he influences into fellow entrepreneurs.

Talk Asia host Monita Rajpal and guest, Pharrell Williams on set.

He has created a forum where people can share and discuss ideas, thereby sealing his own position as a role model. He expresses his own ideas through music, movies, social media, and of course the internet. Williams calls it a customization era because people want what they want right now.
Williams credits his diverse career to a lifelong curiosity that his mother instilled in him. She taught him to be open to all that is around him. And he is.
From conversations with the renowned neuroscientist Dr. Vilayanur S. Ramachandran and their discussions on the psychology of music to collaborations with the artist Takashi Murakami on a sculpture, Pharrell is a man who revels in cross-platform communication because for him, life is about maximizing existence in every way.

Music has been the skeleton key thats opened every door of every opportunity that Ive had.
Pharrell Williams

For Williams though, the most important message he could share to his fans is his perspective on humanity –it is one in which we all have something to offer and it is our duty to our self-respect to live life on our terms. The goal then would be to find a way to serve humanity through our given talents.
Williams shared with me the one thing that stuck with him that Ramachandran told him. He said the apes and the monkeys reach for fruit, but man reaches for stars and thats the difference.
Through that wide-eyed wonder for all that this life has to offer, opportunities have made their way to him. He tells me music has been the skeleton key thats opened every door of every opportunity that (Ive) had.
Well that may be, but its his humility and gratitude that make people seek him out. As he says, he takes his egos hat off and (leaves) it at the door. He is comfortable in his own skin and it shows. Maybe thats why his song Happy has already had over seven million views on YouTube. We all want some of that to rub off on us. I know I do.

To escort — come problems

African Voices is a weekly show that highlights Africas most engaging personalities, exploring the lives and passions of people who escort rarely open themselves up to the camera. Follow the team on Twitter.
Nairobi, Kenya (CNN) — What do the Apollo space missions, laser eye surgery and sustainable cocoa have in common? These are just some of the historic breakthroughs that IBM research labs across the world have helped become a reality over the years.
But the prestigious tech firm had a glaring omission on their global map. Africa is now the fastest growing continent in the world, according a recent report from the African Development Bank. And yet IBM didnt have a single hub there — until recently.
Last year, IBM opened its 12th research facility in Nairobi, Kenyas capital, its first in the continent. Spearheading this innovation center is Uyi Stewart, a Nigerian scientist who has spent more than 20 years overseas working on software answers to real-world problems.
Armed with this international experience, the researcher has now returned to the continent to help create innovative solutions for African everyday challenges.
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Stewart: IBM believes in Africa
Its easy to talk about giving back but when the opportunity presents itself — such as IBM Research Africa that allows you to create innovations in science and technology to begin to make a proper impact in the lives of more than a billion people — I dont know what more can stop anybody, says Stewart.
Conquering the new world
As a teenager Stewart was interested in computer sciences. But his countrys lack of infrastructure prompted him to look abroad as a way of intellectual escape.
The bright Nigerian managed to secure a scholarship at the University of Cambridge in England and with only a plane ticket and bus fare he set off for, what he called, the new world. After completing his education in England, Stewart moved to the U.S. where he began his career in software and services research.
Uyi Stewart left his native Nigeria over 20 years ago to study computer sciences at the University of Cambridge in England. Now hes back on the continent to lead IBMs first African research facility.
Stewart showcases one of IBM Research Africas latest innovations on touchscreen displays. He is currently analyzing traffic data from Nairobi to determine what infrastructure needs to be implemented to ease transport gridlock on the capitals roads.
Kenya has experienced an IT boom in recent years. Dubbed as Africas Silicon Savannah, Konza Techno City is the governments flagship mega project designed to foster the growth of the countrys technology industry.
Stewart hopes to entice more Africans from the diaspora to return to the continent. He explains solutions are more likely from those who fully understand local content and can create solutions relevant to the community.
Stewart says that while the proliferation of mobile devices and associated technological advances in Africa is important, local innovators must not pigeonhole themselves. Right now we are all hearing about the mobile phone as the PC for Africa, maybe there are other affordable devices but no one is really looking at it.
Innovative solutions to everyday problems
Innovative solutions to everyday problems
Konza Techno City
Innovative solutions to everyday problems
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Stewart went on to work in IBMs Services Innovation Lab — an international program where he was responsible for the technical strategy at eight global facilities. Today, having returned to the continent, he wants to leverage the strong growth of Africas emerging markets and continue IBMs longstanding tradition in research breakthroughs.
As I build and design I have got to understand that the majority of my people live [on] under less than two dollars a day, he says. [The] majority of my people only speak one language — so think about those things — that whole holistic view allows technological innovation to be relevant to the community. That is what were calling Africanized solutions.
Lets come back
That approach is central to Stewarts work.
All innovators in the continent of Africa should be problem centric, he says. What problems are we trying to solve and ask yourself, at the end, who is going to use it? If you ask those two questions then we can begin to talk about sustainability.
In recent years the Kenyan government has actively encouraged ICT development in the country. Christened the African Silicon Savannah, the $9.2 billion project known as Konza City is an ambitious undertaking that could help Kenya become a technology and innovation hotspot.
All innovators in the continent of Africa should be problem centric. What problems are we trying to solve and ask yourself, at the end, who is going to use it?
Uyi Stewart, chief scientist, IBM Research Africa
The countrys technological boom has also been spurred by a rise in the number of innovation centers, where young coders and aspiring entrepreneurs join forces, network and work on their trailblazing ideas.
Similar hubs have also mushroomed across the continent in recent years — from Nigeria to Tanzania and Egypt to Madagascar. But while there is a boom in tech spaces across Africa, many of the apps created there often fail to take off. Stewart says tech entrepreneurs need to be cautious about starting businesses without any commercial foresight.
Sustainability of innovation comes from commercial viability, he says. If you innovate for fun, then we wouldnt be where we are today and I think that is the kind of ecosystem we see right now.
After more than two decades abroad, Stewart is committed to reverse the continents so-called brain drain, the exodus of brilliant minds relocating to countries outside Africa.
I am part of the diaspora and I am home, he says. And I am saying lets come back, there is just so much; the winds of change [are] massive — lets come back and make a difference, adds Stewart. There is a tremendous potential for skill of impact when you innovate.

we skipping have bathe

(CNN) — Too lazy to have a shower? Worry no more, theres a lotion for that.
DryBath is a germ-killing gel that allows you to take a bath without using a single drop of water or soap — all you need is to apply the gel on your skin and then vigorously rub it off using your hands.
The special formula will cover the whole body with the cleansing gel, which will use the vigorous rubbing to lift the dirt off the skin, explains Ludwick Marishane, the inventor of DryBath and founder of Headboy Industries.
The 23-year-old entrepreneur came up with his revolutionary idea back in 2007, during a hot winter day when he was relaxing with some friends under the blazing sun in Limpopo, northern South Africa. Man, why doesnt somebody invent something that you can just put on your skin and you dont have to bathe, quipped one of his pals, complaining that he didnt feel like having a shower — and this got Marishane thinking.

To use DryBath, you need to put and rub the gel onto your skin. Courtesy Ludwick Marishane

Still in high school, Marishane immediately took to Google and Wikipedia to start researching creams and lotions, learning everything about their components and how they are produced. Since he didnt have a computer he carried out his investigations using his mobile phone and a few months later hed devised his own special formula — at the age of 17, Marishane became South Africas youngest patent-filer.

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Marishane, who won the global student entrepreneur award in 2011, went on to study at the University of Cape Town and soon got his DryBath-producing business running. He says his trademarked invention can be a precious tool for the millions of people lacking access to clean water and sanitation, as well as an an attractive option for corporate groups — from airlines and hotels to gyms and even aid agencies — who want to encourage their clients and users to save water.
CNNs African Start-Up caught up with Marishane to speak about DryBath, his plans for the future and why he doesnt shower on the last weekend of September every year.
CNN: How would you describe DryBath to someone whos never used it before?
Ludwick Marishane: DryBath is a bath-substituting gel, designed to replace the need for soap, water and skin lotion. DryBath provides its users with a fun and convenient alternative to traditional bathing and showering, a precious tool for helping people to lower the excessive water use that is leading to a looming global water crisis.

DryBath is packaged in easy-to-use sachets and bottles. Courtesy Ludwick Marishane

CNN: What are DryBaths ingredients?
LM: It is a proprietary blend of cleansers and moisturizers that make it a uniquely viscous blend of bioflavonoids, natural emollients, and fruit acids to cleanse the skin, while preventing dryness, irritation and body odor.

We know we cannot do this on our own, and we request any and all help that anyone can provide.
Ludwick Marishane, DryBath inventor

CNN: Can you talk about your companys social goals?
LM: As it stands, there are almost two billion people in the world without adequate access to water and sanitation, all while people in urban societies consume an average of 80 liters of water every time they bathe/shower. It is our goal for DryBath, and other products like it, to change the way society practices personal hygiene, and to provide cheap personal hygiene alternatives to the poor. We know we cannot do this on our own, and we request any and all help that anyone can provide.
The easiest way to provide assistance to our cause is by participating in our annual DryBath No-Bathing Weekend — this is our strategy to allow the public to participate in helping us skip one million or more bathes/showers by skipping them for a whole weekend in September.

The global water crisis is not something thats only affecting impoverished countries anymore, says Marishane.Spencer Platt/Getty Images/file

CNN: What are the challenges youve faced so far?
LM: The challenge our business has been facing in recent years is pricing; we have constantly been struggling to produce and distribute the product at prices that are affordable for people in water-insecure communities — ideally less than $0.10 per bathe. As a startup, we have had to create a parallel product (DryBath Premium) for the urban market — campers/hikers, parents with kids, shared/public-shower users, etc. — that can be sold at a reasonable margin to allow us to make the original DryBath product affordable.
CNN: Which entrepreneurs do you most admire? And what advice would you give to those aspiring to start their own business?
LM: I admire the everyday entrepreneurs — those who sell fruits from their stall at the corner, have a great barbershop/salon, use their car as a taxi cab, etc. They dont do it for any glory or adoration, they just wake up every day to get the job done while still dealing with the risk of not breaking even each month.
I urge all aspiring entrepreneurs to have this approach to business, because its what every great business — big or small — succeeds on.
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At in final said

(CNN) — Despite a miracle shot to join a four-man playoff, Rory McIlroy ultimately was left to rue his failure to negotiate the notorious Bear Trap at PGA National as Russell Henley claimed the Honda Classic title Sunday.
Looking to lead from start to finish, McIlroy endured a wayward final round 74 but after brilliantly scrambling a par three on the 15th still held the lead at 10-under-par.
An ugly double bogey at the 16th after he found the water and a bogey four on the par-3 17th then all but ended his chances.
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The former world number one appeared to need an eagle three on the par-5 to rekindle his victory hopes and from 245 yards hit an approach of laser-like accuracy over the water and to within 10 feet of the flag.
Playing partner Henley fluffed his chance to make a birdie four to get to nine under and McIlroy saw his eagle putt slide agonizingly wide.
It left the pair tied at eight-under 272 with earlier finishers Russel Knox of Scotland and American Ryan Palmer, who had missed a short par putt on the 18th, which would have given him outright victory.
Four-man playoff
Playing the 18th again as the first extra hole, McIlroy attempted to repeat his earlier approach shot but his effort went long and into the back bunker.
He failed to get down in two shots and with Knox and Palmer also having to settle for par fives, it left Henley a short putt to seal his second PGA Tour victory with a birdie four.
McIlroy, searching for his first win of the year after near misses in Abu Dhabi and Dubai, held a two-shot lead over Henley after starting the day on 12-under.
Wayward play saw shots dribble away before he hit the three-hole Bear Trap from 15th to the 17th, designed by golf legend Jack Nicklaus.
Henley, who had chipped in to join McIlroy at 10-under on the 14th, made a hash of the short 15th himself, finding the water with his tee shot to make a double bogey.
But he kept his nerve the better in the final analysis to land the $6 million PGA Tour event.
I was fortunate that I was in the playoff, McIlroy said. I didnt play well enough at all down the stretch to win this tournament.
Its going to take a long time for this to sink in, admitted Henley.
Woods injury scare
Earlier, world number one Tiger Woods was forced to withdraw during the final round with a back injury.
Woods, who has endured a difficult start to the year, shot a third round 65, but was five-over through 13 holes when he left the course.
Woods is scheduled to begin his defense of the WGC Cadillac Championship Thursday and it is only six weeks to the first major of the season at Augusta.
A statement released by Woods said that his back had spasmed while warming up Sunday, similar to the problem he suffered at The Barclays last year, but was still able to finish runner-up.

A received pays says ı

February 9, 2014

In many ways that incident represented progress, Fornoff told CNN recalling the 1986 incident.
That particular player had been doing his best to get in the way of my job for the year and a half I had been on the beat.
The As did not, however, do anything about it until he did something so public that they were forced to take a stand.
I was lucky to work for a newspaper that had editors who unequivocally and vocally stood by me, so I soldiered on.
Fornoff might have received her gift 28 years ago, but female sports reporters are still receiving abuse, though the perpetrators — or trolls as they are more commonly known these days — are usually hiding behind their computer keyboards.

pic.twitter.com/uq8k9vHBir— Laura Williamson (@laura_mail) January 3, 2014

The abuse of women reporters takes shape in many different forms in the testosterone-fueled sports environment.
Its hard enough when youre a young reporter, let alone female too, May 5, 2013

One of the recurring themes throughout interviews was the fact that women have to work far harder to prove themselves than their male counterparts.
There were complaints, particularly in football, that female journalists were patronized by managers when asking questions and often referred to as love or darling.
In December, journalist #cracker— Kane Green (@KaneGreen) August 1, 2012

Since then Oatley has established herself as one of the UKs most respected football reporters, on both radio and television, and has provided an inspiration to women who would love to follow in her footsteps.
However, that path is often obstructed by old-fashioned chauvinism.
@OffsideRulePod birthday celebrations begin! Thanks for all the support from me, @lynseyhooper & @HayleyMcQueen pic.twitter.com/ybF3H6xmr6— Kait Borsay (@kaitborsay) October 29, 2013

There is also huge frustration that qualified female journalists are often overlooked in preference of those who have come from modeling backgrounds.
When employers hire models or girls who pose in mens magazines because it pays well, it demeans everything we do, says Kait Borsay, a respected journalist and part of the successful Offside Rule podcast along with Lynsey Hooper and Hayley McQueen.
Although some outlets are making changes its too easy for them to revert to type when the big decisions have to be made. Broadly, the entire industry needs a shakeup. I am a mother and there are loads of moms by association who watch football and enjoy their sport.
Those women are not provided for. One mom I spoke to said, How do you think it makes me feel having a son really into football, trying to get understanding of game, being told it all by a young glamor puss I cant identify with who probably knows little more than I do?
Fornoff, who wrote the book Lady in the Locker Room, and now covers golf, is disappointed by the lack of progress by women since that gift landed on her desk all those years ago.
I think it was very important that I did not let the rat and many other early-career incidents — the kind all women sports journalists of the time experienced to some degree — discourage me or sway me from pursuing a career that can be a lot of fun, and rewarding for the right person, she says.
I left the baseball beat because I did not think the lifestyle fit me, not because I did not think the job fit me or that I did not fit the job.
I am disappointed to see so little growth and progress for women in sports journalism. It is discouraging to hear of their struggles.
I still hope to see more women on major beats and in charge of sports departments at major media companies.
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